• In the late 1700's and early 1800's Robert Rogers conducted Newport Academy, a private school providing classical education to youth

In 1843 Newport established one of the first public high schools in the state primarily for college preparation.
    In 1872 William Sanford Rogers, son of schoolmaster Rogers, bequeathed $100,000 to Newport "for the education of youth of both sexes.... the income to be applied to the support of teachers of the highest qualifications"

Of this, $100,000 was designated to be used to aid in the erection of a new building to be named.

    ROGERS HIGH SCHOOL
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    In 1873 the new building on Church Street was opened with an enrollment of about 100 pupils. This building was used until 1905. It became Thayer School, and is now the Boy's Club.

In 1874 there were 3 courses offered-college preparatory, scientific, and general. There were no electives. 

On Arbor Day of 1889, the boys of Rogers High School formed a shovel brigade and marched out at shoulders arms to plant trees along outer Broadway.
    Rogers has been represented in football since 1890, in baseball since the 1800's and in basketball since 1906.
    In 1905 Rogers High School moved to a new, larger building on Broadway.
    1931 Rogers students voted to use the coat of arms from the Rogers family as the school symbol.

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    In 1957 Rogers High School opened at the present location on Wickham Road with an enrollment of 1,216.
    The Red and Black was first published in 1920 in the form of a four-page newspaper.
    The Newport Area Career and Technical Center was completed in 1968.

    Rogers first uniformed band was formed during the Great Depression.

    

Fair Rogers
    Fair Rogers! Rogers Fair! Thy name
    Shall ever stand for holy fame,
    From childhood's day we've looked to thee
    As up to some great deity.
    Chorus
    O sing! Ye sons of Rogers! sing,
    Loud let your rolling anthems ring.
    And royal praise to Rogers bring,
    Throughout our city fair.

    Words by Harold B. Walcott, Music by H.S. Hendy