Ideas for transitional readers

  • Help your child select books at a comfortable level.  Listen to your child read.  If he reads smoothly, uses expression and can accurately tell you what he read, the book is probably at a comfortable level.
  • Make reading a priority: find a consistent time to read to or with your child for at least 15 minutes a day.
  • Ask your child to retell small parts of a story to you.
  • Ask questions while you read such as, "What will happen next?" "Why do you think he did that?"
  • As you and your child are reading, take turns coming up with questions, making predictions, and summarizing.
  • One of the most important things parents can do is to provide reading material that is interesting and relevant.  Your child should select books based on their interest.
  • Play a word game in the car.  Each person takes a turn reading as many words as possible.
  • Play word games such as Scrabble Junior, Boggle, ABC Bingo, Word Concentration, etc.
  • Encourage your child to read aloud to younger siblings, cousins, neighbors, even stuffed animals.
  • Have your child re-read familiar books.  Children need practice in reading comfortably and with expression using books they know.
  • Talk with your child about what he or she is reading.
  • Ask about the characters, places and events that took place.
  • Ask your child what he or she thinks will happens next.
  • Have your child retell the story in his or her own words.
  • Read a book together then watch the movie version.
  • Ask your child what the message might be in the book.
  • Read mysteries together then try to figure out the clues.
  • Encourage your child to write letters, notes and stories.
  • Get into a library habit.  Make sure everyone in your family has a library card.  Schedule regular trips to the library.